Stratford-upon-Avon Union Workhouse

Description of this historic site

The Stratford-on-Avon workhouse was built in 1837 at a site on the west side of Arden Street to the west of the town centre. It was of cruciform construction. The former workhouse later became Stratford-on-Avon Hospital. Almost all of the workhouse buildings have now been demolished.

Notes about this historic site

1 The Stratford-on-Avon workhouse was built in 1837 at a site on the west side of Arden Street to the west of the town centre. The Poor Law Commissioners authorised an expenditure of £4,380 on construction of the building which was to accommodate 200 inmates. Designed by J Bateman and G Drury, it followed the popular cruciform or “square” plan with an entrance block at the front, behind which lay the four accommodation wings radiating from a central hub, creating yards for the different classes of pauper (male/female, old/young). The former workhouse later became Stratford-on-Avon Hospital. Almost all of the workhouse buildings have now been demolished. Amongst the few remaining structures is the casuals’ block at the north-west corner of the site. Stone-breaking cells were located at the rear of the block. These still have the horizontal grids through which stone had to be passed after being broken into sufficient small pieces. The cells had an unusual design of interlaced metal grid which apparently served both as an unglazed window and also to allow unbroken stone to be loaded through.
23 The plan of the workhouse is largely unchanged between the 1st edition and 2nd edtion Ordnance Survey maps.

More from Workhouses